Monday, June 1, 2009

Teach What Obedience Looks Like

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I know I have discussed this idea many times throughout the blog in various posts, but it is such an important principle I thought I would bring it out in its own post. We need to teach our children what obedience looks like, as mentioned in On Becoming Toddlerwise (page 93).

Our children are so adept at learning language that I think we often assume they know exactly what we mean when we give them an instruction of what to do or what not to do. For example, consider the habit if whining. Your toddler starts to whine for a snack. Your response might be to turn to your toddler and instruct her "Don't whine. Whining will not get you what you want."

For a toddler who has never been told exactly what it means to whine, all she knows is that this "whining" is something that irritates mom. She will then need to do some experimenting to figure out exactly what whining is. Is whining the way I walk? Is it how I am holding my hands? Is it the words I am saying? Perhaps it is my distance from mom? Etc.

Think back to new situations you have been in. Perhaps your first day of college or your first day on a job. There are always new rules and social customs to learn. There is the local jargon to come to know. As an adult, you have a lot of life experience to draw from to help you figure these things out rather quickly, but it still takes some time. You can see how a two year old might need some guidance in knowing what it means to whine.

When you are giving your child instruction, approach it from the many different senses. All people have different ways they learn best. Some through verbal instruction. Others through watching the process be done. Others by actually practicing it. There are many ways to learn.

Let's go back to whining. Your child comes to you and whines for a snack, "Mommy, I want some pretzels!" You look at her and say, "Kaitlyn, don't whine" (yes, this is a real-life experience for me :) ). You then might demonstrate what it is to whine. "Do you know what whining is? No? Whining is when you make your voice go like this" (at that point you are demonstrating whining).

Now your child has an idea of what it means to whine. Don't stop there! Give her direction. Tell her what to do instead. "You ask nicely for pretzels. Say, 'Mommy, may I please have some pretzels.' " And you demonstrate how to ask nicely. Have her repeat it (to the best of her ability) and then respond with a big smile, "Yes, you may have some pretzels. Thank you for asking so nicely."

Let's review. When instructing your child:

  • Explain the vocabulary words you are introducing. Whether it is to not run, to not yell, etc., explain what it is you are telling your child.
  • Demonstrate what you don't want done.
  • Give your child an acceptable action. Don't just tell your child what not to do; tell her what to do.
  • Explain the vocabulary words of what you want her to do.
  • Demonstrate the vocabulary words of what you want her to do.
  • Have her repeat what you have just shown her. Give her praise for doing so.

These things take time. You won't go through this process one time with your whining two year old and never hear a whine again. If only! It takes time and consistency, but she will get it. With Brayden, I only need to give him a look and he changes his tone himself. Often times he catches himself if he starts to whine before he finishes "Mama." It will come.

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6 comments:

Christie said...

Thankful for this post today, whining is HUGE in our household currently, really trying to push past it :)

Kristin said...

As a testimonial... I have been doing this with my whining 2 1/2 year-old. Now when he comes to me I'm able to say, "try again." He pauses to think about it, then comes back with his adorable version of "Mommy, may I please have..." Sometimes he just says, "please." At that point I again tell him to try again and am able to get the desired result.

P.S. It's nice to read about something I'm actually doing right (not always the case). :o)

CO Mom said...

This is such a great post. I can remember being truly miffed at what my parents were talking about as a kid (talking back, being a smart aleck, etc.). As I got older I figured it out, but that didn't help me initially. It is so important not to assume that our kids know what we mean when we are talking to them. Clarity is so important when it comes to communicating to our kids - especially where training/discipline and proper behavior are concerned. Thanks for this reminder!

Plowmanators said...

You are welcome Christie!

Plowmanators said...

Kristin, thanks for your testimonial! I still have to remind Brayden sometimes.

Plowmanators said...

You are welcome CO Mom! The other week I realized Kaitlyn had no idea what "shh" meant. When I showed her, she suddenly started to whisper when I told her to "shh..." They seem to know so much more than we realize, but there are still things they just don't know as fast as we expect it.

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