Mealtime Booster Seats

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“Parents will inquire as to whether a booster seat is absolutely necessary. No, it is not. However, if a child is kneeling on an adult size chair, he usually lacks the coordination to move food from plate to mouth without creating an enormous mess. A booster seat helps reduce the mess” (On Becoming Prestoddlerwise, page 71).

 

Okay, so when I was a child, a “booster seat” was the largest phone book we had. Times have certainly changed, and I have changed with it!

 

AGE

What age do you move to the booster seat? There is no set age that is appropriate for all ages. Here are the things I consider:

 

1-Mess: How messy of an eater is the child?

 

It is easier for me to clean a high chair than the booster seat and table, so I take into account how messy the child is.

 

2-Plate: Will the child use a plate?

 

I wait until the child can be trusted with a plate at the table without throwing it on the floor.

 

3-Height: Can the child reach my table in our booster seat?

 

Tables. children, and booster seats come in all sizes, so I wait until the child can sit in the booster seat at our table and be able to reach and eat the food.

 

Our Kids

 

Brayden and Kaitlyn were somewhere around 18-20 months when we moved to a booster seat at mealtime. With both of them, we were prepping for another baby around that age. I wanted the highchair long out of their minds so there would be no issues when baby started to use it.

 

McKenna was closer to two.

 

FEATURES

There are so many Booster Seats out there. Tons. So when you are buying your first, how do you decide which one to buy? Here are some features I would consider.

 

1-Color: Does it matter to you?

 

Many booster seats are designed with children in mind. Ours happens to be a nice, bright blue. If I were to pick today, I would probably go for something more neutral. It isn’t a huge deal, but my preference is a bit different than it was the day we bought it. It might be the fact that we have since moved and the kitchen is attached to our great room, which is our formal room, so I have this nice bright blue booster seat in my formal area. Again, not a life-ruining thing, but if you are buying new and have the option of being choosy, just consider if color will be an issue for you.

 

2-Straps: Do you want them?

 

There are some booster seats out there that are basically just a seat that sits on your kitchen chair–really just a glorified phone book. This would be fine for the child who needs an extra boost who is close to 3 or 4, but I really think that for a child 2 or under, you really want straps.

 

I am talking straps not only for the child to be strapped in the seat if needed, but also to be able to strap the booster securely to the chair. Ours features both. If it did not have those straps, then McKenna would not be able to climb into the chair on her own–we would have to put her into it so it didn’t fall down every time she climbed up into it.

 

Straps for the child–we did not need them for Brayden nor Kaitlyn–they both sat nicely. McKenna, however, has had her share of meals strapped in so she wouldn’t stand up. I am glad ours has straps.

 

So my recommendation is that yes, you do want straps.

 

3-Tray: Do you want one?

 

Many booster seats out there come with a detachable tray. This can be nice if you have company over and you need to free some space at the table. I personally wouldn’t make the tray a deal breaker, but I know for some it might be.

 

4-Height: Measure your table!

 

Our booster seat has an adjustable height so we can get it to the right size for our table. You will want to be aware of how high it needs to be and how high is too high for the child’s legs to fit under the table. Our table has several inches of wood that go straight down from the table top, which means our legs can’t be too high, but the child needs to be able to reach the table.

 

5-Travel: Do you need it to be easily moved?

 

Some boosters are easier to travel with than others. We actually have a a separate travel booster that folds down compactly (The First Years On-The-Go Booster Seat). We keep it in our vehicle and if we are visiting grandparents or friends and need it, we can pull it out.

 

When Brayden was a baby, we just used his booster seat to travel with (our bright blue one). It doesn’t fold down at all, so it took up a fair amount of space, but with one child space wasn’t an issue. It is more of an issue with our three children.

 

So consider how easy it is to move and how compact it can get when moving it.

 

6-Cleaning: How easy is it to clean?

 

Most booster seats are made of plastic, and plastic is easy to clean. Some are other materials and fabrics, though. Consider ease of cleaning as you choose–especially the “arm rest” area. That is where sticky hands touch the most.

 

YOUR TURN!

What features are important to you? What couldn’t you live with out? Do you have a booster seat you just love?

 

And, what age did your child move to the booster seat?

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