Friday, February 5, 2016

Competitive Sports for Kids {the Good, Bad, and Real}


Competitive sports for children are starting younger and younger. More children are starting playing competitive sports and younger ages and more leagues are dropping the age minimum for playing on a competitive level. So is playing a competitive sport good or bad? What is the reality of playing competitively?

Our experience with competitive sports so far is limited with only two children being old enough to participate. Brayden swims competitively and plays in a competitive basketball league. Kaitlyn plays competitive soccer. 

Now, there are things McKenna could be doing competitively. She could be doing dance or cheer. She is almost ready to do swimming. She is approaching the skills needed for gymnastics. But she is 6, and for our family, we have decided 6 is too young to commit to something on a competitive level. My main reason for that thinking is that I want my children to experience multiple activities before choosing one to focus on. Once you choose a focus, other things have to go. 

That doesn't mean 6 is too young for every child out there. That is the decision we made for our family. Decide what is best for yours. 

Good
  • The child has to work to play: When a child leaves the recreation sports world and enters competitive sports, your child now needs to earn that playing time. The coach no longer works to make sure everyone is in for the same number of minutes. Different coaches do things differently, but typically a coach rewards effort, heart, and dedication. Skill is also a high consideration on playing time. So if a child wants to play more, a child has to put in the effort to earn it. If your child doesn't love the sport enough or have the will to put extra time into it, moving to playing competitively might not be the best option for your child.

    When Brayden started competitive basketball this year, it was his first team sport on a competitive level. It was his first time having to try hard to earn playing time. He has risen to the occasion. On top of his team practices, he gets up early twice a week and he and my husband spend time practicing before school. He has seen improvement and he is learning a valuable lesson about what practice can do in a sport.

    It is worth noting not all competitive avenues will have this benefit--for example, in competitive swimming at Brayden's level, any registered swimmer on a team can enter a race at a swim meet for many meets. Some meets do have requirements for you having previously raced at a certain speed or faster, like state meets. 
  • Skills improve: When you play against better players, you get better. You are also practicing more. This last spring, Kaitlyn joined a competitive soccer team for her first time. Previous to this, she played soccer for two months each fall and two months each spring. Once she was on the competitive team, that season extended through the summer. So she played her two spring months and continued two practices a week all summer (save a two week break). Then fall season started. Once it ended, they continued practicing one time a week for two more months. They are on a two month break right now. When you play that much more, you just get better. 
  • The child plays with people who know the game: As you continue to get older, you still get children playing in a recreation league who have never played the sport before. There is nothing wrong with that at all--I think children should be allowed to join at any age. I never played a minute of soccer until I was pushing 30, so I am all for people trying new things when they want to. Some children can find it frustrating when they want to play a game on a certain level and can't because not enough people know how to play. Sometimes rec teams get put together unfairly so you have a team of primarily new kids and a team of 6 year veterans. Some children will enjoy playing competitively in order to play against children who know how to play.
  • The child learns to channel nerves: The stakes feel higher competitively. You might go to tournaments. Even at the end of a normal season, teams are given placings and medals or trophies that reflect those placings (which I happen to think is fabulous). All through life, we face nerves. Nerves facing tests in college. Nerves facing a job interview. Nerves making certain decisions. Nerves having a baby...nerves are part of life. 
  • Children develop close friendships and bonds: When you spend your time with people, you usually get close to them. I love the friendship that comes from being a part of a group or team. When you work together toward common goals, a bond develops. 
  • Competitive sports can teach invaluable life skills: Practice pays off. You have to be a team player. You need to rely on other people. Sometimes you can work your hardest and still not win. Patience. Endurance. Tenacity. These are all skills that a person develops when they put the time and effort into something that a competitive team requires. 
  • Children learn to work hard physically: Your body can do so much more than you think it can or it thinks it can. Physical fitness builds mental toughness. My husband played football growing up. He often reflects on his high school workouts as a football player and knows if he could handle that, he can handle whatever life is throwing his way at the time. 
Bad
  • Limits number of sports a child can play: There is only so much time in a day. There is only so much you can dedicate in life. Once you dedicate time to one sport, it limits your options in others. Most sports have seasons and a child is able to play each sport in its respective seasons, but once you go comp, your season extends for that sport. That will means if you start another sport, you will have to give some things up in another. For example, last Fall, Brayden did rec basketball. He missed two of his games because he was racing in swim meets. This winter, he is doing competitive basketball. He is having to miss swim practice one day a week for basketball practice. He will miss part of a swim meet because of basketball later this month. 
  • Skills aren't built from other sports: Because your ability to commit to other sports may be limited, you might not be able to play other sports enough to develop those skills. Many skills are transferable among sports. This article really sums up the importance of being able to play multiple sports.
  • Injuries can increase: We are finding as more children play one sport year round that injuries are increasing. Children are still growing and are susceptible to injuries from focusing too much on one sport. This article is helpful if you want to read more about this.
  • Children get burnt out and end up hating the sport: This happens often. I have a friend whose niece was recently offered a full scholarship to a university to play soccer. She turned it down. By that point, she decided she hated soccer. She had played it too much.

    We had a neighbor who breathed soccer. He played it as soon as he got home from school until it was time for bed. We moved, but a few years later saw the father and asked how soccer was going. "He hates it. He won't even look at a soccer ball anymore." Burn out is a real thing, even when children love a sport.
  • It takes a lot of time: A competitive sport takes up a lot of time for the child and by association for the entire family. If you have one or two children, playing a competitive sport might be very manageable. Make that several kids and things get tricky. 
  • It takes more money than the same recreational level sport: Competitive sports take a lot more money. It is more money to register to play the sport. Then you add jersies. You often add equipment for the team costs. You have tournament registration costs. Travel costs. It all adds up, and it adds up quickly. 
  • Children fear making a mistake and losing the game for the team: Remember that pressure I talked about in the "good" section? That doesn't always lead to a "good." Sometimes it leads to a "bad" with a lot of stress and anxiety over making a mistake. 
  • Children can have such little playing time that skills don't develop or they don't enjoy it: When a child signs up to play a sport, the child wants to play the sport. The child doesn't want to sit. Rarely are kids happy with sitting. If a child is on the side of sitting on the bench more than playing, the child will not enjoy it. The child will also risk not improving skills-wise with not as much playing time. 
How to Get the Good and Limit the Bad
  • Find a good coach: A good coach is so valuable. A good coach will work with the children
    and give them as much as he/she can to help the child improve. A good coach will focus on more than the win in the particular game. A good coach won't accept too many players on the team so kids have to sit more than is reasonable. 
  • Require commitment: If your child wants to participate in a team sport, make it clear what will be required. Once the child is signed up and on board, make sure the expectation is that commitment will follow. We make it clear that we don't care if the child is the best or not, but we do want our child to be doing his/her best. We are not paying extra money and putting in extra time unless the child is willing to put in extra effort. So much of the "good" list only happens if the child works. Finish out the season and reevaluate when it is over. 
  • Make sure it is fun: The experience needs to be enjoyable for the child. That will depend on your child's attitude, your attitude, and the coaches attitude. 
  • But learn from the challenges: It won't always be "fun." There will be times of hard work. There will be failures and freak accidents that seem unfair. There will be bad calls. Learn from the challenges. At one swim meet, Brayden dove in the pool to swim his best stroke. He was having his best meet of his short career and this was going to top it off. But his goggles came off in the dive. He panicked and looked at me with fear in his eyes. I told him to keep going. He did. He got probably his worst time ever on that stroke, but he finished that race and wasn't ever disqualified. His team cheered for him like I have never heard them cheer for any one person. Most have been there. He felt support. He felt pride that he completed even under hard circumstances. We point out that those are moments he will remember forever and draw strength from in the future. Those are learning moments.
  • Allow breaks: Don't push your child too hard too fast. Burn out happens in every competitive avenue. The way to avoid that is to allow breaks. Kaitlyn had the opportunity to do a winter soccer league indoors. We chose not to do that so she could freely play basketball and let soccer leave her brain for a few months. Kaitlyn doesn't even know what her favorite sport to play is yet and we don't want her to focus in on one sport. Brayden should be going to swim team practice five days a week. He is ten years old. We have him go three days a week. We also make sure we work it out so one of those days is not Friday. We will also make sure if things are super busy with other stuff and he can only go twice one week that we are okay with that. We don't want him to hate swimming and want to give it up because he got too much of a good thing at a young age. 
  • Know the process: Assuming this was your child's idea, your child will likely start out loving it. Then reality will set in and your child will not like it and will want to quit. This is the hard parenting moment. I strongly encourage you to have your child finish out the season and reevaluate at the end. Look, a competitive activity is hard work. It starts out seeming glamorous, but as soon as the reality of the work required sets in, the child may want out. This is how Brayden was with swimming his first year. I told him that he wasn't allowed to quit mid-season, but we would reevaluate after it was over before signing on for the next season. By then he had been through the hard times, over the hump, and really enjoyed it. He continued. Your child needs to see what happens when you push through and keep trying.

    This is a common process in people in general. I even see it in my kids in the musicals I direct. It starts out exciting, but the beginning is a lot of little details and practicing songs and just learning dance moves. There is a long period of time it isn't a lot of fun (except for those kids who can't get enough--there are always those kids). If they push through, however, the payout is fantastic. 
  • Don't sign the child up unless the child really wants to do it: Competitive activities take enough effort that you don't want to sign the child up unless the child really wants to put in the required effort. Explain what will and could be required. Don't sugar coat it. Talk about how it will be different from rec sports. Talk about what could be hard. Also talk about what can be great. 
  • Diversify: Make sure your child is able to play different sports and do different things. Kaitlyn still takes piano lessons. She still takes dance class. She is still participating in a musical. She played softball and basketball. Brayden still takes piano lessons. He participates in scouts. He is in a musical. Beyond that, make sure there is still time for downtime at home and time to play with friends. Free play is important. 
  • Encourage effort: Be accepting of effort. Don't expect professional performance. Expect best effort and nothing more.  
  • Point out improvements made: "You have really been working on rebounding and today you made a lot of rebounds! That work paid off." It is good for children to recognize when their efforts have resulted in improvement. 
  • Be okay with a loss: A lot can be learned from losing a game. Be okay with losing. It is easy to be happy when you win. Losses will come and you all need to be okay with that. 
  • Don't disparage the coach in front of your child: I won't even do this in a rec situation. Sometimes a coach does something you wouldn't have done yourself. But as soon as you talk bad about your child's coach, it opens the door for your child to blame the coach and not accept personal responsibility. I am sure there are times people will need to say, "Hey, what your coach did wasn't right." Most of the time, however, it is best to keep comments away from your child.

    Also, most of the time, my husband is the coach for our kids. Coaching isn't easy and it is full of judgement calls. Most of the time, coaches are doing the best they can. 
  • Carpool: The impact of time on the family can be greatly reduced by carpooling. With Kaitlyn's soccer, she would need to be at games 30 minutes early at least. If we had a conflict with that 30 minute window, we would call up a team mate and see if they could take her and we went in time for the game to start. We would take other kids when other people needed help. Carpool to practices. Help make life easier for everyone. 
  • Take personality into account: Is your child an introvert? If so, be very mindful of the number of days a week your child is committed to something. Brayden is an introvert and can only handle so much time away from home before he gets flustered with life. Kaitlyn, on the other hand, is an extrovert and seemingly can't get enough time out having fun playing sports and doing other activities with friends. 
  • Don't make it about scholarships: Odds of even playing as a collegiate athlete are slim, much less a full scholarship. Statistics say around 7% of high school athletes go on to play in college. Not all players get a full ride scholarship. Don't do it for the scholarship. Your money that you are spending on competitions, gear, and fees can go into a savings account instead and you can pay for college that way. 
  • Don't live your dreams through your child: Don't force your dream on your child, whether it be that you achieved your dream and want your child to enjoy it also or that you wish you had pursued a dream and didn't. Many children will do things just because their parents want them to even if they don't enjoy it. 

Your child can have a great experience with competitive sports if you are wise about the process. Do it for the right reasons. Find a great coach. Expect difficulty. Learn from the difficult times. 

Related Posts:

Thursday, February 4, 2016

Our Favorite Snow Gear


If you live somewhere where winter lasts, the winter months can get looooonnngggg. Cabin fever and feeling housebound are real things. Those can be greatly remedied if your child will play outside, and your child is more likely to play outside if your child has good gear to stay warm and dry. Playing in the snow can completely wipe you out, and being completely wiped out is definitely what you want from your kids playing outside. We want exercise and physical stimulation. We want a change of scenery and to burn some energy. 

If you don't typically have a snnowy climate but you are going to visit one (or you have a snowmagedon approaching), you might want to prepare but have no clue the best way to do so. 

Layers
The first step to proper dressing for playing in the snow is layers. If you want to safely spend a lot of time outside in the cold, you want some good layers underneath. I personally always like to start with some thermals, then another layer of warm and soft clothes. I  HATE to be cold and I very easily get cold (I am that person who likes a jacket when it is in the 70s outside). 

Now, you don't have to buy special for layering. I haven't purchased anything out of the realm of normal clothes for my kids. I encourage soft fabric that is long sleeved and long pants for wearing under the next step. I highly recommend no jeans for wearing outside to play in the cold. 

If you want something great, Under Armour is a great brand. It is lightweight, which is nice by the time you have the full layers going. It also wicks sweat and dries fast, which is nice for staying dry. A bonus of this is you can use it during something like soccer season if you are playing out in cold weather. Thermals are also a great under layer if you need something fantastic. 

Snow Pants
The next layer is snow pants. Snow pants keep you dry and warmer. You can do Snow Pants (this link takes you to a pair we own) or Snow Bibs. Snow pants are just pants and snow bibs are the ones that look like overalls. Which is better? It is up to preference. I like bibs and my husband likes pants. I like bibs for the extra layer of warmth around my trunk, and he dislikes them for the same reason. 

One tip if you are buying snow pants/bibs, I like to buy all black or gray when buying for Brayden. The reason for this is that then all of his sisters can wear it. Fun color, if you care, can be added through the child's coat. I like pants to be neutral. We have had to buy snow bibs for Kaitlyn once and did buy pink because she has all girls behind her, so colors might be economically fine for you looking down the line. Snow pants can be passed on from child to child, so just keep it as child swap-able as possible. 

Also, you don't have to go super expensive. Many of our toddler and preschooler bibs are from somwhere like Target. If you go way cheap, however, you will get what you pay for (and that means a wet child who wants to come inside after ten minutes). The more expensive brands do keep you warmer. We like brands like Columbia and Kamik. 

Socks
You will also want socks. You can layer socks if the boots are big enough. I usually just use normal socks, but Wool Socks can definitely add warmth.

Boots
Don't underestimate the benefit of a good pair of boots. We have had cheap boots and we have had expensive boots, and I will only buy nice boots for my kids now. I use the same idea for boots when buying for Brayden as I do snowpants; I get boots that are gender neutral so his sisters can wear them. A tricky thing is people's feet grow at different rates, so what his feet were one winter might not be the right size for what a sister's feet are when she is near that size. 

You can wear bigger boots, especially if you add sock layers. I buy boots a little bigger than I would buy everyday shoes in hopes of getting an extra year out of them. Just like with the snow pants, I like Columbia and Kamik brands. I own these Kamik boots and love them. Brinley currently owns an older pair of these Kamik boots that we bought when Kaitlyn was in that size (and we bought two sizes that winter so she could wear the same boots when she grew out of the one in the future). They have been fantastic for all of our girls. Kaitlyn currently wears these Kamik boots and raves about them. McKennea is wearing these Columbia boots that Kaitlyn used for two years before passing them on to McKenna. They are fantastic. Brayden is in these Totes boots. They are okay. Not fabulous, but not terrible. We accidentally stumbled into nicer boots for kids one winter when Kaitlyn was in a smaller size than we had boots for and we found a great sale on some Kamiks, then we realized how awesome they were. He won't need new boots until next winter. We will get him some nicer boots then.

Now, if you don't like in a land with snow on the ground straight from November-March, you might not care about as nice of boots. We do. If you are looking for some inexpensive boots for a weekend away or a big storm coming in, get something inexpensive and layer up on the socks. 

Hat
beanie hat is a rule I have for my kids playing outside unless they pull their coat hood up. Hats help keep the heat in your body and keep your warmer. I have never bought anything fancy. 

Gloves
Cold hands lead to children coming inside. True fact. You want waterproof gloves--not knit. We usually buy gloves with Thinsulate. For kids three and younger, I always use mittens--but waterproof mittens (which are hard to find). Some four year olds will do better with mittens also. They are easier to get on and easier for the kids to still use their hands while still staying dry. As they get to four or five, an actual glove will likely be preferred. 

Coat
We just use whatever our winter coat is for playing out in the snow. I do save Brayden's old coats for extra snow coats for the girls. Often you play in the snow one day and the coat is still damp the next morning, so sometimes we play in one coat and wear the other. You can get away with a normal coat if you have enough layers on under it. If you want a great brand, Columbia and The North Face are my two favorites. For me, I wouldn't only buy really nice coats. For my kids, I usually just buy what looks good somewhere like Shopko, Khol's, or Smith's Marketplace (Kroger). BUT this time of year is a great time to find steals places like Amazon--like this Columbia Girls' Katelyn Crest Jacket. certain sizes are as cheap as any cheap coat you can get at a department store. 

Scarf
scarf is a nice layer if it is super cold. It helps keep you warmer. If it isn't that cold, it isn't necessary. For my kids playing in the snow, I really prefer the fleece scarf. It dries out quickly after coming back inside. 

So what are your favorites for playing in the snow?

Related Posts: 

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Time Change Warning 2016

daylight savings spring forward march 10 2013
image source

It's that time again (already?!?) to change the clocks. Okay, you have a little more than a month before it is officially time. But it is coming. I honestly feel like I just started got adjusted to the new time maybe 6 weeks ago. We will be moving our clocks forward an hour March 13. Those of you who don't have to mess with the time change, know that I am jealous and I hope you appreciate every minute you don't have to mess with it. It adds up to at least two months a year of happiness. Maybe four. 

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Kaitlyn Preteen Summary {8.75 Years Old}

Kaitlyn loves art. This is her at the Art Institute in Chicago. She entered our art show competition at the school
and did quite well. She likes to enter every category. 
This is a summary for Kaitlyn from 8.5-8.75 years old.

EATING
Eating is great. She has really accepted the fact that we have food requirements. I would guess she has had taste buds change also to help her be more accepting of foods that used to offend her sensibilities. 

She hasn't increased the amount of food she eats like Brayden had at this age. 

SLEEPING
Sleeping is good. Nothing of interest changed here.

EXTRA CURRICULAR
During this period, Kaitlyn participated in basketball, piano, and dance. She had a handful of soccer practices still, but no games. She also auditioned for the musical at the elementary school. She really enjoys being on a stage and lights up when she has an audience. She ended up getting  speaking part, so that will fill a lot of her time for the next couple of months. 

SCHOOL
Kaitlyn loves school. I shared last time about how she was scared to take voluntary tests. She went from being one of the lowest in reading test points to one of the highest. Once she tried it and saw it wasn't scary and knew it was okay if she didn't pass, she started testing as often as possible. She is very goal oriented and loves getting all of her things she needs to pass off as early as possible. 

Her teacher recently named her the Student of the Month for the character trait "caring." Her teacher said she chose her not only because of her caring nature, but because she always goes the extra mile on her work. 


Kaitlyn dressed as Hermione for Halloween
PERSONALITY DEVELOPING
I find it so fascinating to see my kids' personalities develop as they continue to grow. There are things you know about them right away. Kaitlyn has always been easily characterized as sweet, kind, and thoughtful. She is coming into new interests. One is her love of musical theater. She has always enjoyed going to musicals, she and I often do that for our dates. She has also always enjoyed music and has always shined on stage (she started taking dance at age 3). But her love for specifically theater is growing. She couldn't get enough of the last musical we went to together. She loves to do accents and voices. It is just interesting to see talents and interests grow and develop over time. I am always so curious to see where my kids will put their main passion in life--what they will choose to focus on. Kaitlyn loves everything she does, and has an equal passion for sports as she does music. 

BODY ODOR
I wanted to point out that many children around this age need to start wearing deodorant. Kaitlyn isn't there, but I wanted it on your radar if you have a child around that age. My side of the family actually doesn't really get stinky like that--I usually don't even wear deodorant (I was out of deodorant all together from May-August last year), so she might have inherited the gene. Too soon to tell for sure. 

SCHEDULE
School schedule:

7:00 AM--wake up. Eat breakfast. Get ready. Practice piano. Do morning chores. Read scriptures. 
Then go to school.
4:00 PM--Home from school. Homework. Free play.
5:30 PM--Dinner. Then time with family.
7:00 PM Start getting ready for bed.
8:30 PM--in bed 



Monday, February 1, 2016

Schedule Overview: The Newborn Weeks


Sometimes you just need a big picture overview of how things will progress. I have written a comprehensive first year overview that includes what to expect in eating, sleeping, and playing. This post today is a schedule overview. You can see samples from each week. These are real schedules we really used. 

Week One
You don't want to stress about the clock during week one, but you don't want to ignore it, either. Some newborns are super sleepy and will not wake up unless you wake them up to eat. If you are waking baby, aim for eating every 2.5-3 hours. Start your morning, go every 2.5-3 hours, and then end with your evening feeding around 10-11 PM. Then night starts. During night hours, don't go any more than 5 hours. Make sure your baby is eating 8-10 times a day. 

Have a target time to wake up each day and wake baby up to eat at that time each day. Choose your ideal start of day time, but recognize baby will have a natural disposition that will come out in later weeks. I like to aim for about 7:30, but that is just my personal preference (and I have only had one of my four babies who agreed with 7:30). 

If baby is waking to eat, go with baby's lead for feeding. Don't stress out if baby wants to eat more often than 2.5-3 hours. One thing you do want to be sure of is that baby is eating a full feeding each time. 

Week Two
The same rules of week one apply to week two. 

Week Three
You will now start to focus more on getting that routine in. Continue to focus on a morning wakeup time. Work to eat every 2.5-3 hours. There might be times when your baby needs to eat every 2 hours. 

You might have a growth spurt this week. If so, your baby will wan to eat every 2 hours all day, maybe sooner. This is okay! This is not a problem! No need to stress. Just feed baby more often. 

Here is a sample schedule:
7:30--nurse
10:30--nurse
1:00--nurse
4:00--nurse
6:30--nurse
9:00--nurse

I went to bed after the 9:00 nursing. She then woke twice in the night to nurse.

Week Four
If a growth spurt didn't happen in week three, it will in week four or five. 

Here are a few sample schedules from our week four:

Sample 1:
7:30--feed
8:20--nap
10:30--feed
11:20--nap
1:30--feed
2:20--nap
4:30--feed
5:20--nap
7-7:30 (time varies here)--feed, then bedtime
10:00--dreamfeed

Sample 2:
7:30--nurse
8:30--nap
10:00--nurse
11:00--nap
1:00--nurse
2:00--nap
4:00--nurse
5:00--nap
6:30--nurse
7:30--nap
8:30--nurse then bed

Sample 3:
7:45--nurse
10:30--nurse
1:30--nurse
4:30--nurse
7:00--nurse
10:00--nurse

I still woke her twice in the night.

Week Five
Watch for the growth spurt if it hasn't happened yet. Really be focusing on keeping baby awake for some playtime throughout the day if you haven't started yet. 

Here is a sample schedule from our week five:

Sample 1:
7:30--feed
8:20--nap
10:30--feed
11:20--nap
1:30--feed
2:20--nap
4:30--feed
5:20--nap
7-7:30 (time varies here)--feed, then bedtime
10:00--dreamfeed

Week Six
This is the week you can officially stop waking baby up to eat at night every 5 hours if you feel like baby is ready for it. 

Sample 1:
7:30--feed
8:20--nap
10:30--feed
11:20--nap
1:30--feed
2:20--nap
4:30--feed
5:20--nap
7-7:30 (time varies here)--feed, then bedtime
10:00--dreamfeed
then night feed(s). Typically, this happens between 2:30-3:30 AM.

Sample 2:
7:15-7:45--nurse. I changed our 30 minute window to this.
10:30--nurse
1:30--nurse
4:30--nurse
7:00--nurse
10:00--nurse
She woke twice in the night for the first half of 6 weeks old, then went down to once a night.

Week Seven
This is a week you start really hoping sleeping through the night will be coming soon. For some babies, you might be just hoping to go down to one feeding a night instead of two (I was there for a couple of babies!). 

This is our daily schedule that we shoot for. Our first feeding varies the most. It typically ranges between 6:30 and 7:30 AM. She is now old enough to do 2.5 to 3.5 hour intervals between feedings, so if she is sleeping when the time comes up, I let her go up to 30 minutes longer. She will eat better if she wakes on her own, and if not, those extra thirty minutes can often be enough to get her interested in eating.

Sample 1:
7:30--feed
8:20--nap
10:30--feed
11:20--nap
1:30--feed
2:20--nap
4:30--feed
5:20--nap
7-7:30 (time varies here)--feed, then bedtime
10:00--dreamfeed
then night feed(s). Typically, this happens between 2:30-3:30 AM.

Week Eight
Again, this is a time we are hoping for sleeping through the night! I added in cluster feeding with one baby at this age, which helped with longer stretches at night. Your baby might be able to do only six feedings in a 24 hour period at this age. 

Sample 1:
7:30--feed
8:20--nap
10:30-11:00--feed
11:20--nap
1:30-2:00--feed
2:20--nap
4:30-5:00--feed
5:20--nap
7-7:30 (time varies here)--feed, then bedtime
10:00--dreamfeed
then night feed(s). Typically, this happens between 2:30-3:30 AM.

Week Nine
Wonder Week 8 can creep up this week. Baby can be more clingy, cry more, lose appetite, and sleep poorly. Some babies will be able to drop the dreamfeed at this age. It isn't unusual to be much older, though. Baby also might be able to go 9-10 hours of sleep at night, but there are still plenty not sleeping the solid 7-8 hours yet. 

Sample 1:
7:30--feed
8:20--nap
11:00--feed
11:50--nap
2:00--feed
2:50--nap
4:30-5:00--feed
5:20--nap
7-7:30 (time varies here)--feed, then bedtime
10:00--dreamfeed
then night feed. Typically, this happened between 6-6:15. Toward the end of the week she slept until 7 AM.

Week Ten 
Here are a few samples:

Sample 1:
6:00 AM--eat
7:00 AM--nap
9:30 AM--eat
10:20 AM--nap
12:30 AM--eat
1:20 AM--nap
3:30 or 4:00 PM--eat (sometimes she wakes at 3:30, sometimes she continues sleeping and I get her by 4:00).
4:20 or 4:50 PM--nap
5:30 or 6:00 PM--eat (I always get her by 6)
WITCHING HOUR TIME PERIOD--sometimes she sleeps, sometimes not
8:00 PM--eat
8:30 PM--in bed
10:00 PM--Dreamfeed

Sample 2:
7:30 AM--eat
8:30 AM--nap
10 or 10:30--eat (I always get her by 10:30)
10:50 or 11:20--nap
1 or 1:30--eat (I always get her by 1:30)
1:50 or 2:20--nap
3:30 or 4:00--eat (I always get her by 4:00)
4:20 or 4:50 PM--nap
5:30 or 6:00 PM--eat (I always get her by 6)
WITCHING HOUR TIME PERIOD--sometimes she sleeps, sometimes not
8:00 PM--eat
8:30 PM--in bed
10:00 PM--Dreamfeed


Sample 3:

7:30--feed
8:20--nap
11:00--feed
11:50--nap
2:00--feed
2:50--nap
4:30-5:00--feed
5:20--nap
7-7:30 (time varies here)--feed, then bedtime
10:00--dreamfeed

Week Eleven
Here are two samples:

Sample 1:
7:30--feed
8:20--nap
11:00--feed
11:50--nap
2:00--feed
2:50--nap
5:00--feed
5:20--nap
7-7:30 (time varies here)--feed, then bedtime
10:15--dreamfeed

Sample 2:
7:30 AM--eat
8:30 AM--nap
10 or 10:30 AM--eat (I always get her by 10:30)
10:50 or 11:20 AM--nap
1 or 1:30 PM--eat (I always get her by 1:30)
1:50 or 2:20 PM--nap
4:00 PM--eat
4:50 PM--nap
6:00 PM--eat
6:45 PM--put in swing (due to witching hour)--sometimes she sleeps, sometimes not
8:00 PM--eat (essentially a dreamfeed--no waketime)
8:30 PM--in bed
10:00 PM--Dreamfeed


Week Twelve
Here are two samples:

Sample 1:
7:30 AM--eat
8:30 AM--nap
10 or 10:30 AM--eat (I always get her by 10:30)
10:50 or 11:20 AM--nap
1 or 1:30 PM--eat (I always get her by 1:30)
1:50 or 2:20 PM--nap
4:00 PM--eat
4:50 PM--nap6:00 PM--eat
6:45 PM--put in swing (due to witching hour)--sometimes she sleeps, sometimes not
8:00 PM--eat (essentially a dreamfeed--no waketime)
8:30 PM--in bed
10:00 PM--Dreamfeed


Sample 2:

8:10--feed
9:10--nap
11:30--feed
12:20--nap
3:00--feed
3:50--nap
6:00--feed
7:00--nap
8:00--feed, then bedtime
10:15--dreamfeed

Week Thirteen
Watch for Wonder Week 12 this week. Here are two samples:

Sample 1:
8:00 AM--eat
8:50 AM--nap
10:30 AM--eat
11:30 AM--nap
1:30 PM--eat
2:30 PM--nap
4:30 PM--eat
5:30 PM--nap
6:30-7:00 PM--eat
7:30-8:00 PM--sleep in swing due to witching hour
10:00 PM--Dreamfeed
5:30-6:00 AM--early morning feeding (she wakes for this, I don't wake her)

Sample 2:
8:10--feed
9:10--nap
11:30--feed
12:20--nap
3:00--feed
3:50--nap
6:00--feed
7:00--nap
8:00--feed, then bedtime
10:15--dreamfeed

Week Thirteen
Here are a few samples:

Sample 1:
8:00--eat
8:50--nap
11:00--eat
12:00--nap
2:00--eat
3:00--nap
4:30--eat
5:30--nap
6:30 or 7:00--eat then down to bed
10:00--dreamfeed
Every other night, she ate between 5:30 AM and 6:00 AM. Those days, we started at 8 AM. The other days, she at between 7:00 AM and 7:30 AM. She still slept until about 11:00 AM.

Sample 2:
8:10--feed
9:10--nap
11:30--feed
12:20--nap
3:00--feed
3:50--nap
6:00--feed
7:00--nap
8:00--feed, then bedtime
10:15--dreamfeed

Sample 3:
7:30--nurse
8:30--nap
10:30--nurse
11:30--nap
1:00--nurse
2:00--nap
4:00--nurse
5:00--nap
6:30--nurse
7:30--bed
10:00--nurse then bed (dreamfeed)

Related Posts:

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails